Tuesday, 10 June 2014

Owl Cafe Fukuoka (Review)

Japan has made the cat cafe popular. Recently, owl cafes have become popular. While I've never been to an cat cafe before, I've been to the owl cafe in Fukuoka three times (in my defense, I was bring people there). If you're in Fukuoka, this is definitely a place you should visit (unless Singapore suddenly starts an owl cafe)

The cafe is located near Canal City at Nakatsukawabata. To get there, you have to get out at Nakatsukawabata (中津川端) station, take the exit towards canal city and walk down this path:

The decorations change according the the seasons. 
All the way down, just before you see the escalator to canal city, you will see the shop (it's next to a tea shop, which is next to Hana Hostel).

The sign of the shop. It just says "Owl shop" in Japanese
The cost is 1000yen for one (non-alcoholic) drink and slightly less than one hour with the owls (although it does seem like you can come in halfway through a session and spend less time with the birds. You can leave earlier too).

For alcoholic drinks, it's 1200 yen.
One important thing to remember is that reservations are required. You can make them on the same day, so you can conceivably go there, make a reservation, head over to Canal City to eat with Moomin (yes, it's that restaurant that seats toys with you - all customers get Moomin, not just the lonely ones) and then come back for your time with the owls.

Make sure you get to the shop five minutes before the appointed time.

When you go in, you will be guided to the second floor where your order will be taken.

I think this table is so cute! There are plants growing in the middle! 
 These were our drinks: You have to leave them at the table when you're petting the owls, so it may be easier to order something that you can take with you when you leave the place.

Again, cute cup *squeal*

Before anything happens, your have to sanitise your hands with the hand-sanitiser on the table.


By the way, the sheet on which the hand-sanitiser is resting is a guide on how to approach the owls. If you don't speak Japanese, an English guide is available upon request. However, the briefing is done only in Japanese.

The wall, decorated with these cute owls *more squealing*
Before you get to go down to interact with the owls, there is a briefing about how to stroke them and which owls you are not allowed to bother (basically, those that are resting). In addition, you are not allowed to take any videos due to privacy issues, although you may take as many photographs as you like.

And as you can expect, I have many many photographs of the owls (and with the owls too).  They are just too adorable!

This owl disagrees. He's giving me the =.= face. I guess he isn't amused.
All the hours have names, and feel free to ask the staff questions about them! You can see that staff really cares for them(:

Owls that you can play with are on this ledge
The staff will help guide the owls onto your arm/shoulder/head. Unfortunately, for the larger sized owls, you can only put them on your arm. You can, however, put the smaller sized owls on your head (and risk getting poop in your hair - I hear it's a good conditioner) or shoulder (and risk getting your shirt pooped on)

WHAT DID YOU SAY? I WOULD NEVER
Ok, for me, I've never been pooped on. A few people close to me have had a few close calls though.

I may be tiny, but I rule this human! 
 I've learnt that different owls have different sizes.

*crickets*

What? I didn't know that different breeds have different sizes. Before I came here, I assumed that most owls looked alike and had the same size.

My pretty cousin and the bird

By the way, you can buy an owl at this shop. However, whether you can afford the owl, and whether you can bring the owl back home is another matter.

Are you going to buy me? 
Links:
Osaka and Hakata Owl Cafe Blog (Japanese only)
Hakata Owl Cafe Facebook Page

I previously mentioned the owl cafe in this post, although it doesn't have as many photos as this one.